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INTERVIEWS

Bill Laswell: No Boundaries

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For some people music is a mere entertainment product, a pastime amusement. For others music is a powerful force and the act of its creation carries within itself a sense of discovery. Bill Laswell's music, production and remixes have always carried that sense of discovery and riskiness. Multifariously creative and independent, he has always been revered by avant-gardists, jazz and improv and electronic music fans with equal zeal.  In the last 30 years, this incontrovertibly cool producer has ...

BUILDING A JAZZ LIBRARY

Rare and Unusual Instruments in Jazz

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Historically the cornet was the quintessential jazz instrument but over a century of its evolution other instruments have also become part of the regular jazz armamentarium. These include common ones such as the piano, saxophone, bass and drums to the more occasionally appearing violin, clarinet and other percussion instruments. There are few, however, that exhibit unique sounds and though infrequently utilized within the jazz mainstream, represent a fresh and delightfully unusual approach to the music by its ingenious practitioners.

INTERVIEWS

Chris Potter Underground Orchestra: Imaginary Cities

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Writing jazz music, says Chris Potter, is “a bit of a zen exercise." “A lot of what you're thinking about when you're writing is the stuff that's not there. You're thinking about the solos and the way the band is going to play it together--things that can't be notated." For Imaginary Cities, his eighteenth and most recent album as bandleader, composition presented the saxophonist with a greater challenge than usual on account of just how much ...

INTERVIEWS

Glenn Zottola: A Jazz Life - The Early Years

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Part 1 | Part 2 | Part 3 World-renown trumpeter, saxophonist, musical director, producer and entrepreneur. These are but a mere handful of words that describe the vast talent in Glenn Zottola's bag of musical marvels. There are others: child prodigy, creative genius, “musical natural" and aural savant also percolate rapidly to mind. Now in his sixth decade of playing professionally as a rare and masterful “Triple Threat"--he plays and has recorded on trumpet, alto and tenor saxophones--Zottola's ...

INTERVIEWS

Chantale Gagné: Composer on the Rise

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Chantale Gagné has been locked in with some of the best musicians on the scene since the pianist/composer moved to jny: New York City in 2008. She's an import from Quebec. Raised in a rural part of the province, she cut her teeth in jazz circles in jny: Montreal before moving to the Big Apple. She's not only taken to the town, but her deft touch and great feel on her instrument has endeared her to musicians in her new ...

INTERVIEWS

Band Ambition: Sherrie Maricle and Diva

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In the iconic photo A Great Day in Harlem (1958), bandleader and pianist Count Basie has taken a seat on the curb. Eleven neighborhood kids and one ringer, Taft Jordan Jr, are seated single file to Basie's right. Marian McPartland and Mary Lou Williams stand behind the kids, chatting. They are bookended, appropriately, by Oscar Pettiford and Monk. The only other woman is Maxine Sullivan. I never noticed her until now--a telling oversight. Fifty years later, the ...

JAZZ ART

Drawing Jazz

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A twist on the old cliché, “Those who can't play--draw,"--that's my personal point of view. I've been a jazz nut since as long as I can remember, and as soon as I could push a pencil--even though I could barely bang out a simple tune on a piano--I was sketching some of my favorite players, Charles Mingus, Miles Davis, Duke Ellington. In 2000, after beginning a career as a graphic designer, I was awarded the position of design ...

INTERVIEWS

Albert "Tootie" Heath: Class Personified

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Albert “Tootie" Heath is among the drummers who lived--and thrived--during what many call the golden age of jazz, the '40s, '50, early '60s. He's enjoyed the fruits of a varied and historic career, but never stayed put. Just kept working. He admires the musicians of today and the direction of jazz. The jny: Philadelphia native extols hip-hop for its status in today's music world. On the way to age 80 at the end of May, he is still growing and ...



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